Botox Frequently Asked Questions

People who cannot get Botox include anyone who:


Has had an allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in Botox

A skin infection at the planned injection site

Is currently expecting a child




What Does Botox Treat?


Wrinkles result from a combination of many factors including cellular changes that can occur over time, reduction of collagen, and damage caused by free radicals in the sun and the environment. When you frown or concentrate, the muscles between your brows contract, causing your skin to furrow and fold and when you squint, the muscles around your eyes contract and cause crow’s feet. BOTOX® Cosmetic works beneath the skin’s surface and targets the underlying muscle activity that causes frown lines and crow’s feet.

There are many non-cosmetic disorders that can be treated with botox, including migraines and excessive sweating. It can treat disorders of the esophagus, the bladder, and almost all skeletal muscles of the head, neck, torso, back, and extremities.




Will Botox make me look like I’ve had work done?


Botox is a technique-sensitive treatment. You should not lose the ability to show expression when you are treated by someone who is licensed, trained, and a medical expert in facial anatomy. It is important to talk to your specialist about the results you want from treatment.




How long does the treatment take?


Your specialist will discuss your treatment goals and perform a facial analysis to determine the appropriate treatments for you. The actual injection process takes about 10 minutes.




Does Botox treatment hurt?


Some patients report that being injected with BOTOX® Cosmetic feels like a pinch. Your specialist may use ice to numb the treatment area. If you are concerned about discomfort, your specialist may apply a topical numbing cream before administering your treatment.




What were common side effects seen in clinical studies?


Three percent of patients experienced eyelid drooping in the frown lines studies and 1% of patients experienced eyelid swelling in the crow's feet studies. Other possible side effects include: dry mouth; discomfort or pain at the injection site; tiredness; headache; neck pain; eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight and dry eyes; and allergic reactions. These are not all of the possible serious side effects of BOTOX® Cosmetic. Please see the Important Safety Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide, and talk to your specialist.




Botox After Care


Post botox care starts with trying to exercise your treated muscles for 1-2 hours after treatment (e.g. practice frowning, squinting, or raising your eyebrows). Although this is thought to help, it will NOT negatively impact your treatment if you forget to do this.

You may have small bumps at each injection site. This is completely normal. Do NOT rub or massage the treated areas for 4 hours after your treatment.

Avoid lying down for 4 hours after treatment. This is to avoid the risk of applying pressure on the treated areas from your pillow and the migration of the Botox to an undesirable muscle.

If you need to apply makeup within 4 hours of your treatment, only use a GENTLE touch and avoid rubbing the treated area.

Do NOT do strenuous exercise for 4 hours after treatment. This will minimize the risk of raising your heart rate and blood pressure and therefore minimize the risk of temporary bruising.

Feel free to shower and go about most other regular daily activities.

Avoid Aspirin, Advil, and Vitamin E in order to reduce the risk of bruising. Tylenol is a good alternative if you have any post-procedure pain or a headache. If you take medications for medical reasons, such as Aspirin, Plavix, or Coumadin, continue to do so. Although these medications slightly increase your risk of bruising, their benefits outweigh the risks.